Video shows Turkey's Erdogan watched from limo as his guards bashed protesters in Washington, D.C


#23

“After this incident, Erdogan met personally with U.S. President Donald Trump,”

The linked article says the meeting was before the incident.

And not everyone is happy:


#24

Correct. Diplomatic immunity only means there will be no prosecution. It does not mean you get to break the law. We have this odd circumstance where in our nation, the police and DA will not bother anyone they don’t think they can get a conviction on - unless contempt of cop is involved.
The D.C. police need to be held accountable for this.


#25

I find myself thinking that so often these days, reading about people in or somehow connected to this administration. The fact that That Man has made my country a friendly place for such as Erdoğan and his thugs is abominable.


#26

Doing a heckuva job, Recep.


#27

Worse still this was a Pro-Kurdish protest. We like the Kurds goddammit! At least more than Turkey.


#28

Am I alone in fuming outrage over this situation—where our own citizens can now be charged with felonies for demonstrating against our own regime, but thugs from other countries can riot with reckless abandon on our city streets? Hypocrisy like this makes me wish I had a rocket launcher.


#29

Wow…you can see the big bald guy walk from the car, beat up people, and reappear by the car. Clearly dispatched by Erdogen and his crew. The guy with the mustache comes running back first, followed by the huge bald guy.


#30

Because “Yay!” for blaming and punishing a whole group for what some do?


#31

If I went to Turkey and started wailing on some Turks I would expect them to go all Midnight Express on my ass. I’m not a diplomat, and neither were these thugs.


#32

You do realize that many Turks oppose Erdogan and are being attacked by his government for doing so? This isn’t very funny.


#33

At least the majority of Turks living in the USA aren’t exactly fans of Erdogan. Not so much in other countries though…

(red= “No” vote)


#34

Indeed. I’d suspect that it partial correlates to how much anti-Muslim or anti-Turkish sentiment people in each country either experience or think they experience. Plus, the nature of US immigration from Turkey is probably different than in say, your country, where it was primarily from guest workers in the 1960s and now their families - more likely to be working class and more likely to support Erdogan because of his religious language?

I’d suspect that more Turkish Americans are political dissidents or middle or upper middle class (business people, academics, etc) who are less religious and more likely to be politically progressive.


#35

Exactly - mostly rural, religious/political conservative, educationally deprived/disadvantaged.


#36

It’s one of the failures of the German immigration system that they didn’t give Turkish immigrants a path to citizenship but instead let them languish for multiple generations in this guest-worker status. And now they’re surprised that more of them didn’t embrace Germany’s secular Western values and put Turkey behind them.


#37

If I’m not mistaken, Germany only recently shifted to birth right citizenship, correct? Like in 2000 and something? So the entire time the guest worker program was active, it was citizenship by blood, not birth.

I guess as an American, I find that odd, given the 14th amendment.


#38

As I like to say, European countries tend to place the emphasis on the first part of the term “nation-state,” where North American ones place it on the last part. Although that’s changing.


#39

It’s a weird mixture of ius sanguinis and ius solis now.


#40

Thank you!


#41

[quote=“FFabian, post:20, topic:101256”]
The topic isn’t related to Germany in any way[/quote]
It is easy to criticise other countries. OK, I’m an American and as such deplore both my government’s tolerance of autocratic thugs like Erdogan and their cynical use of terrorism as an excuse to abrogate basic civil and human rights both at home and around the world. As for Turkey, I will absolutely positively resist any movement to make Turkey the 51st US state.

Maybe just once you can agree that your own country has her own problems in this regard, and doesn’t fart rainbows?

  1. Unlike the USA Germany doesn’t claim their laws are in force in other countries.

Not recently anyway.

§103 is removed January 2018.

Sure it is.


#42

?

Why should I? That isn’t/wasn’t the topic. You chose the wrong hill to die on though (I’ll just quote myself):

Perhaps you should use PM if you want to discuss issues with a single user.