Walmart to remove confederate flag from stores


#1

[Read the post]


#2

How about stop selling the guns the man used to murder and assassinate the humans?


#3

Hey pal, there’s a nice profit in fear.


#4

fine, great, but how about guns & ammo? still available, i’m guessing.


#5

As Obama said, the overly easy availability of guns is a problem, but he got blasted, and rightly so, for not also addressing systemic racism and white supremacist terror. BOTH issues are problems, and when institutions move to stomp out the sanctioned popularity of this fucked-up flag, that’s progress on one of them.

As activist Kevin Alexander Gray, who lives in Columbia, SC, says, in SC, “a Confederate flag on the bumper of a car is just as common as a stop sign.” SC is

also where Dylann Roof learned that Blacks are constantly raping white women and trying to take over the nation, said Gray. “That kind of racist talk is as old as the relationship between Black folk and white folk in America.”

(Black Agenda Report)

Guns are a huge problem, of course, but so is the fucked-up flag. A movement against it is a step toward recognizing and digging up the deep roots of, and the common tolerance of, white supremacist hatred and violence.


#6

Also, this:

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/jun/23/mississippi-confederate-flag-consider-dropping-emblem

Watching Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, Arkansas, Florida and North Carolina with interest.

Does anyone really care about state flags, though (except Texas - I’m sure they do in Texas, but elsewhere)?


#7

Well no, but it’s pretty easy to see why people do care about a state-sanctioned one that celebrates racism and treason.


#8

Granted, and I think Mississippi’s in particular needs to go, and I wouldn’t be sorry to see the others I mentioned follow. I understand the importance of the symbology. I was just wondering if people are really that attached to theirs compared to the national flag.

I can’t imagine anyone gets particularly teary eyed over this thing:


#9

I never thought Mississippi would even consider it. We live in a crazy great world.


#10

Don’t you dare touch my state’s flag. It’s got a goddamn grizzly bear.


#11

Has anyone ever done one of those challenges where they get people to draw their state flag from memory, like that recent article about the Apple logo?


#12

True, not all that attached, and that lack of attachment to state flag’s themselves might make it that much easier to get rid of those that still recall the Confederate flag.

I’d love to see that! Though the results would probably include a lot of completely blank pages. I have no idea what my state flag looks like.


#13

This was my attempt. Those people represent states which are not California.


#14

Yeah, I had to go look up my home state of Missouri just now. Heck I would probably do a bad job of that even if I knew what it looked like. Basically like the Washington flag state seal in the middle but with a bit more color in the background. Boring.


#15

Since people can’t recall a simple apple with one single bite taken out of it, I have little confidence that even lifetime residents could accurately recall the male elk, the male deer, the eagle and whatever the hell is going on inside the crest:


#16

I can’t count the number of times I’ve explained that terrible people don’t come with warning signs. Bad people don’t wear signs around their necks saying they’re awful people. They don’t wear black hats.

But some of them do fly confederate flags, and so that’s helpful.


#17

Bigfoot!


#18

Given the fabulous rural schools (/sarc), probably.


#19

I just realized my state’s flag has two of those eeevil GUNS on it. Pardon me while I hie myself to the fainting couch:

Perhaps we should replace the two rifles and the liberty cap with two selfie sticks and a fedora, and change the state motto from “Mountaineers Always Free” to “Mountaineers Always Cautious”.


#20

I would have bombed miserably. I could have sworn it was a powder blue.

http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/kids/stateflag.asp

Now Ohio, where I went to 6th grade to learn Ohio history, I’d knock that out of the park.

However, reading “Ohio has adopted an official salute to the flag and a 17-step procedure for folding it.” I’m thinking that someone cares about the Ohio flag a lot more than I do. I mean, 17 steps? I can’t even manage folding fitted sheets when my mom visits.