“We’re PG police and we shoot people,” said a police officer now convicted of assault


#21

Police unions aren’t labor unions. Union organizations themselves are even starting to say this. A California UAW local of 13,000 education workers called for police unions to be expelled from the AFL-CIO. As their resolution said:

“Historically and contemporarily, police unions serve the interests of police forces as an arm of the state, and not the interests of police as laborers.”

#22
On March 17, 2010, a Bonn Hells Angels member shot dead a 42-year-old police officer of the SEK (Spezialeinsatzkommando) during a house search. He was subsequently acquitted of murder charges by the German Supreme court, stating that he acted in self-defense after murder threats by Bandido members.
(Wiki) Yes, Germany - but I am fascinated by this story.

The court ruled it as self-defense because the officers didn’t announced themselves as police when the Hells Angels member screamed from inside “Go away!” before he shooted through the door.

In an interview the guy said he feared for his life when the police finally stormed the house - but he was only roughly handled when he was tackeld and chained. Not sure if I would react so professionally when a colleague of mine was shot seconds before.

Most of our law&order politicians and the police unions decried the acquittal as judicial wrongdoing.


#23

The plural of anecdote is not “data.”


#24

We are finally seeing headlines of cops getting charged and even convicted of brutality, but very little follow up posts of these guilty cops actually serving time. Are we there yet?


#25

Did I claim you argument is invalid? Mostly I wanted to share an interesting story - the main reason why this was discussed widely over here is the rareness of such an acquittal.


#26

Santiago will serve a mandatory minimum sentence of at least five years without parole for using a firearm in a violent crime. Alsobrooks said he could be sentenced to a term of up to 45 years.

(Prince George’s County State’s Attorney Angela D. Alsobrooks)


#27

Yes, this! I don’t get how he goes to jail for 5 years minimum but could still get his job back?? This is a very poorly written story. Even if he’s served his time, it sounds like a felony. Can you be a cop in PG with a felony on your record??? WTF?


#28

Do open prisons exists in the US? If so he could be by night in jail for firearm crimes and by day working as cop </s>


#29

Ah, fair enough.


#30

Not really. We have some halfway-house programs but a crime that is considered violent like assault would probably not fit that. We have “country club” federal prisons for rich people that get caught doing wrong and can’t pay their way out of it (or are women/minority).


#31

Wonder how he’s liking those mandatory minimum sentences now? Even if he makes it out of 5 years of jail unscathed, I don’t imagine any police department would touch him. Can he even posses a gun after he gets out?


#32

Very good to know, thank you.


#33

Santiago will serve a mandatory minimum sentence of at least five years without parole for using a firearm in a violent crime. Alsobrooks said he could be sentenced to a term of up to 45 years.

Not if he goes to jail.


#34

How do these two remarks relate to each other? I didn’t describe any of my actions in my comment you replied to.

If you are suggesting that people complaining about injustice and oppression has no consequences unless they actively oppose it in their dealings with people in daily life - then I agree.


#35

That’s a bit of a knee-jerk reaction. Police unions are the worst.


#36

There would have to be a DA that gives enough of a fuck to ruin their relationship with the cops for that to happen. Sounds like a pretty big IF to me.


#37

I beg your pardon. I was mistaken in thinking of police unions as labor unions. This was very kindly pointed out by @zikzak just above. [quote=“zikzak, post:21, topic:70168”]
Police unions aren’t labor unions. Union organizations themselves are even starting to say this.
[/quote]


#38

There’s some pretty inconsistent responses in the US when police officers who fail to identify themselves are breaking into someone’s house as part of a raid and get shot by the occupant, even when the police are actually at the wrong address. It seems to depend on the skin color of the occupant. If they’re black, it seems certain they’ll get charged with (and likely convicted of) murder. But that seems to be the circumstance in which there’s any hope of not being convicted of shooting a police officer: being white, with a cop breaking into the house that the police admit was the wrong home, in the middle of the night, while not identifying himself as police.


#39

Wait, you mean to say you advocate violence on line, but don’t actually live the life of a cop-killer? Are you not aware of the inherent contradiction? How can this be?


#40

We’ve seen that running your medical marijuana operation to the letter of the law, and recording the officers on video as they steal and eat your edibles, will not get you far.