"Alex Jones' Infowars isn’t a media empire — it’s a snake-oil empire," says Select/All


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/05/09/alex-jones-infowars-isnt.html


#2

I don’t so mind that fools and their money are being parted. My biggest hesitation is that said money goes to Alex Jones.


#3

Well, he’s got a potentially nasty child-custody battle on his hands, so he needs all the money he can get.


#4

More brilliant would be selling them a supplement that makes them more susceptible to paranoia and conspiratorial thinking. Then the things really sell themselves.

Take a note from Scientology, my man (from Wikipedia)

The program requires its participants to ingest the following at regular intervals:

A multi-vitamin cocktail, the main ingredient of which is niacin. Clear Body, Clear Mind recommends initial doses of 100 mg, increasing to 5,000 mg over the course of the program.[7] This contrasts with the medically recommended level of about 15 mg: larger doses can have severe, even potentially fatal side effects.[7] The participant is told to expect toxic symptoms due to the release of poisons or radiation from their body fat.[16] Thus the effects of niacin overdose, which include skin irritation, flushing, dizziness and headache, are interpreted as a positive effect of the rundown.

See also:


#5

He makes all his money selling bullshit products to insecure middle-aged men. Why am I not surprised?


#6

So, “pitching woo” has acquired a new meaning?


#7

Reminds me of religion: he promotes a vision of dire harm then offers a solution which only he can provide, except neither the danger nor the cure really need to be proven or disproven since any evidence to the contrary must be propaganda to throw you off.


#8

Yes, Infowars viewers, take as much colloidal silver as you like. Here, have more!!


#9

OMG have you heard about the cloud people?


#10

He sells “health” products too?
I didn’t realize his fans were that stupid.


#11

Cool. so now I know just to avoid blue people.


#12

If a grifter can get his weak-willed marks to buy into the intangible idea of an invisible conspiracy (or an all-powerful invisible entity, for that matter) then selling them actual products is even easier. Glen Beck, for example, would whip up his audience up about the coming apocalypse and then cut to a commercial for a numismatic gold outfit (which he happened to own a healthy chunk of).

Now we can just call his followers “Smurfs”:


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#13

And ye shall know them by their silver-gray pallor.


#14

Right, because Jones himself totally looks like the ideal picture of “perfect health;” and not an alcoholic, overweight dude who looks 15 years older than he actually is.


#15

Alex Jones is a deadbeat Dad too, no surprise there.


#16

I think he lost custody. But I suppose he still has to pay his lawyer.


#17

This is kind of brilliant (although that might be accidental). It reminds me of the Nigerian prince scams - they set up the con in a really clumsy way to only catch the people with no critical thinking skills - only this has the added benefit of having a certain synergy. (If the dietary supplements cause brain damage, it’d be the perfect synergy.)


#18

What a clever scam. He says stupid things to make sure that his audience is as stupid as possible, then sells them things only stupid people would buy. Dammit, wish I thought of it first


#19

#20

To be fair there’s another reason for that one.