Federal charges for Donald Trump

I would fluv a Guy Fawkes-like day to celebrate TFG’s downfall, however it may come about.

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Spiro Agnew’s plea deal involved not running for federal office.

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I’m torn between wanting to never see his face ever again for the rest of my life (even in effigy) and enjoying the idea of throwing a wig on a pumpkin-headed scarecrow and blowing it up with fireworks.

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Instead of masks, we’ll all don bad yellow wigs and spray tans.

Don’t stand there and tarry
on 6th January
Remember the Qnuts mad plot.

I give no affection
to Chump’s insurrection
and never will it be forgot.

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I like the idea of burning him in effigy over dressing up.

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let’s make a week of it!

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That feels about 17% wrong.

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That’s an oddly specific percentage.

:thinking:

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“Penny for the Former Guy?”

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This Is simply not true. The constitution lays out the requirements of who is eligible for president, House, or Senate and there’s nothing that states you need a clean criminal record. The only requirements are around age and length of citizenship (and in the case of president, birthplace).

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it’s never been quite clear to this american whether people are partying for the sake of foiling the plot to blow up parliament, or for the idea that someone tried. and every time i’ve asked a british expat, they look at me like i’m insane ( maybe, i guess, it’s simply an excuse to party? )

perhaps burning the orange one in effigy would be a similar way for us all to come together. the white supremacists will cry into their beer - bud light with the labels torn off, and just a single tear like ■■■■■ so often wished manly men would do for him - and the rest of us can jeer and laugh, throw rolls of paper towels at their heads, and write down all their names

hmmm. i may have lost my point here. never mind

yes please. if we could get him, cheney, shrub, and rumsfeld’s corpse all in the same small cell, i think justice might finally be served

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I can see why people who believe Donald’s shitposts are so angry all the time. :roll_eyes:

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Ooooh I like it - especially if there is a delightful little follow up investigation which sees Kushner and his plastic wife taken down for possessing state secrets.

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This is true, but my point was that the Georgia case is about conduct of elections and slates of electors and vote counting, which is something that may well end up affecting fundamental aspects of the US electoral system and may well force action by Congress and the Supreme Court.
Whereas charging an individual who, let’s face it, we all thought treated confidential information as being just a bargaining tool for his whole career, is significant in relation to Trump himself, but not necessarily leading to anything wider (consider that the similar cases of Pence and Biden seem to have both been resolved perfectly normally.)

I mean, I’m not optimistic that the Georgia case will lead to anything, because it would require all of the main pillars of the US government to admit that they are no longer truly fit for purpose (executive, legislature and judiciary), and that’s more than just a long shot right now. But the more light that can be shone on areas that are broken, the better.

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I AM AN INNOCENT MAN!

HE’S JUST A NORMAL MAN!

HE’S JUST AN INNOCENT MAN!
 

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It does not. Again, the only thing that would make him ineligible for office would be something running afoul of the 14th Amendment, which would be sedition or rebellion.

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Open and shut case then, no?

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Well yes, but not in the way I assume you mean. I don’t think any of these charges involve sedition or rebellion.

Look, I don’t want him to be able to run for President. I wish these charges could prevent that. They don’t. They just don’t. Unless he agrees to it as part of a plea deal (I don’t see him accepting a term like that but who knows), this won’t prevent him from running for President. Hell, as pointed out already, and just to add more detail, Eugene V. Debs was convicted of sedition under the Espionage Act in 1918, sentenced to 10 years in prison, and even disenfranchised for life, and was still allowed to run for President in 1920. So I’m not even sure a sedition conviction would prevent Trump from running, but I don’t think that’s one of the charges.

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had to Google to be sure those are not Rush lyrics

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