Major piranha attack in Argentina


#1

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#2

I thought pirhana rarely attacked people.


#3

Hunting is easier after you instill a false sense of security.


#4

That bites.


#5

There’s also a massive heat wave, now running strong for over 11 days, and sporadic power outages around the day, everywhere in buenos aires. Shitty, shitty summer down here in argentina.


#6

Which part of PIRANA RIVER did they not understand?!?


#7

Different spelling. They got confused.


#8

Something ate the sign warning visitors not to go into the water…


#9

Now I’m confused. Should I or should I not cancel my surfing trip to Grate Wite Beach?


#10

It’s a good thing there weren’t any cows.


#11

True. Cows kill people! A lot!

http://www.geog.ucsb.edu/events/department-news/1195/forget-sharks-cows-are-more-likely-to-kill-you/


#12

I don’t know, I’m confused too. I’m sitting here at the edge of Lyon Atak forest, which is just off Afrikaanized Beaz road, and now I’m thinking you should definitely go.


#13

this piranha like “bawal” in indonesian but not too ferocious


#14

I’ve swam in the Amazon and it’s tributary rivers in Peru many times and never had a problem. We knew they were there because we fished and caught them in the same spots. However once there is blood in the water it is time to get out in a hurry. They’re great fun to catch. Boney but not bad to eat. However if you want something real scary look up the toothpick fish…


#15

I don’t understand why the River Paraná (pah-rah-NAH, which is Tupi for “like the ocean”) is “aptly named” regarding the piranha (pee-RUN-ya, which is Tupi for “tooth fish” or “cutting fish”) ;]


#16

Different spelling. They got confused.

Yeah, generally piranha are poor at reading. They probably thought that’s where they were supposed to be.


#17

I’m from Rosario, Argentina. These fish aren’t not the same species of the Amazonian “piranhas”, and they’re called “Palometas” here in Argentina. The are predators of smaller fish, that on hot days gather around shallow waters amongst reeds or other acuatic plants. The city, over many years, has developed a large sand beach and erased the natural coastline vegetation, but somehow the fish didn’t noticed this, who knows why! So the place where the prey of the “Palometas” (who hunt in schools, gathering the other fishes against the coast) now is chuck full of bathers, especially when the outside temperatures are well over 30ºC. Since there are many thousand people swimming in this exact place of the river, only 60 bitten in such a day is something that’s not extraordinary. A few years ago, a stranded “Yacaré” (a type of South American alligator) drifted here and everyone freaked out.
Check how crowded can be this beach: http://rosariomasjoven.org.ar/uploadsfotos/3917-31_balneario_la_florida_b.jpg


#18

That is one crowded beach indeed.


#19

How many people were skeletonized? And how long did it take? We need more data points.


#20

Well, we’re at zero so far. And it’s looking like these piranha are VERY slow to do proper Hollywood work with us.

There were a couple of elderly people involved, and also some very thin people. Both groups are arguably partway there already.