New Oreo Thin is perfect for people who don't like Oreos that much


#1

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#2

Interesting. I don’t like tomatoes. Do you think I’d enjoy one sliced really thin?


#3

Ooh, if they really want to appeal to people who don’t care for Oreos they should do one with a Marmite filling.


#4

I don’t know about you, but I’m actually this way about a lot of foods. I hate potatoes on their own, but like fries and chips - but only if they’re thin. Thick, steak fries I can’t stand. Tomatoes are another one that I like when they’re juuuust thin enough and cooked on top of something else, but if you make them too thick, I can’t stand them.


#5

I miss the Hydrox. After eating a Hydrox cookie, Oreos seem crumbly, mushy and overly sweet by comparison. I think they might be gone for good, though- they brought them back for their 100th anniversary in 2008, but apparently didn’t sell enough to justify a full revival. For all I know, the package in my freezer might be the last ones in existence.


#6

Don’t like tomatoes? Pfft! Your invitation to my garden party now has you down for bringing macaroni salad, mister! (I’m gettin’ pretty surreal early today…)


#7

My brain seems to be refusing to grok this product.


#8

Oreos. There is no fricking apostrophe used when you are writing about more than one of something. PLEASE.


#9

I was actually talking about how much I hair the Oreo filling. This is interesting, might check it out.


#10

You may mock, but we all know triangular sandwiches taste better.


#11

You’d enjoy it less, by increasing the tomatoey surface area touching your mouth.

However, I’d bet you’d enjoy one really thin slice of tomato better than a really thick one.

Science!


#12

BTW, did you know to get the perfect crispy cookie it requires ammonia? It all bakes out, but that is the sekret ingredient.


#13

If only they could process the tomato into some nice, easily consumed sauce, and get rid of all those unpleasant fibrous bits and suchlike.


#14

I much prefer Trader Joe’s Joe-Joes to Oreos.

Mostly, it’s been my experience that eating Oreos turned my stools black (http://biology.stackexchange.com/questions/9487/why-is-my-faeces-black-in-color-after-eating-oreos)

Lastly (if I haven’t turned you off already), someone should trace the historical average Oreo diameter over the decades. Maybe my hands have gotten bigger, but they seem smaller now.


#15

Many years ago I heard that scientists were working on a square tomato that, because it would be so much easier to ship and wouldn’t be as easily damaged, would create such a surplus of tomatoes that the industry would have to start making tomato chips.

I’m still waiting because those really sound good to me.

That reminds me of my mother serving rum balls at Christmas. My paternal grandfather loved them. My paternal grandmother, the teetotaler, would scold him and he’d say, “They’re fine. The alcohol bakes out.” And then he’d wink at my mother because he knew damn well she added the rum after baking.


#16

Sounds good to me! I do like Oreos, but prefer the cookie part, so a higher cookie > filling ratio sounds appealing.


#17

Yet another way for a company to sell less of the same ingredients for a higher price per ounce while trying to convince us that it’s new! Fun! Bite-size! Or adult, maybe! Food prices are holding steady, citizen.

Oreos have been shit since they took the lard out in the 90s, anyway.


#18

I didn’t know that Hydrox were no longer made, I had assumed that I only moved out of their distribution area. Weird that the article somebody linked said that people are unlikely to buy even a better filled cookie for a lesser price because they like the name “Oreo” better. I go by taste, texture, nutrition, availability, price, etc - the name they are marketed as is among my least relevant factors.

Ammonium hydroxide? Maybe that’s from whence the “hydrox” name originated. Any idea how much they use? Suppose I might research some recipes for it to get an idea as to how it may be used.


#19

Those might be thin enough to make an Icebox Cake


#20

Not much, and it is stanky as hell. It is usually sold as Bakers Ammonia, and king Arthur flouts has some recipes. It is odd stuff, but the only thing I know of that works to make something super crisp without caramelization in a reasonable amount of time.

Eta

Ammonium carbonate