Police officer ignorantly and aggressively detained autistic boy who was just stimming

https://twitter.com/kristinrawls/status/910335324798296064

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Which is why my wife and I insist our Type 1 diabetes son always has his Medic Alert bracelet visible whenever he is driving.

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Drumbeat of constant authoritarian violence.

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Stop Resisting!

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They absolutely should be trained to better deal with stuff like this, but there will never be any incentive for them to do so because cops never have to face consequences for anything they do. Why bother treating people with any kind of care when you can just beat/tackle/shoot them and the consequences for you are exactly the same? (If you answered “because it’s the right thing to do”, you probably wouldn’t be allowed to become a cop in the first place.)

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This is like the boiling frog analogy - don’t you people realise you’re living in a POLICE STATE!?
so what if he had been intoxicated, so what if he was acting weird - the issue here is not how to deal with autistic people it’s your out of control authoritarian state.

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Well, police have an incentive to beat, maim, and murder people. Police who beat, maim, or murder people get a paid vacation.

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I quit after five minutes of watching. Lady, stop apologizing already!

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And a serious question is - Why don’t people subject cops (and other government) to reprisals for such betrayal, instead of… impotently petitioning them to not do it anymore? Isn’t expecting them to self-police in this climate rather naive? They don’t have superhuman powers, they are somewhat trained murderous dipshits who pull this off time and again because they succeed in intimidating the public.

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Wow this cop is surely detective material. What the fuck happened to just talking to someone and asking if they are ok instead of jumping to the worse conclusion and manhandling them like a piece of meat?

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It’s just heavy handed policing by any standard, the kid wasn’t bothering anyone so what’s wrong with the cop, I suppose he thought he’d be an easy target to bust because he wasn’t behaving ‘normally’.

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There really should be some sort of list of unlawful things. And maybe a training course you can attend to learn about it.

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Most police officers in this country are no longer peace officers. They are soldiers in a war. This is how they are trained. This is how they are armed and geared. This is how they see themselves. Because of this, anyone they interact with on any given day will immediately be classified as either an enemy combatant, a brother in arms, or a civilian. And because the war began, and still largely is, the war on drugs, anyone they see who reminds them in the slightest of anything having to do with drugs, including odd or eccentric behavior, will instantly be identified as an enemy combatant and be dealt with accordingly.

I knew all this on some level before, but it was made crystal clear to me at the Kansas City Renaissance Festival this past weekend. There were police there on duty, which was fine. They were armed and in body armor, which was not fine. Not to me anyway. There was no need for armed police in body armor there. Nothing happened, but it just really bothered me.

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I may be biased, because I have both an autistic nephew and two twin nieces with a degenerative neurological condition, but that officer could have figured out the kid wasn’t drunk simply by taking more than 5 seconds to talk to him before attempting to detain him.

Why wasn’t that attempted? Is the standard procedure to put someone in handcuffs before they begin to assess the situation? If the kid was physically intimidating, why didn’t the officer call for assistance before attempting to restrain him?

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The thing that really gets me is the repeating of “So you don’t have nothing on you?”

After the officer has already established that’s he’s autistic, would it have been so hard to ask “Are you carrying any weapons or anything dangerous? Are you carrying any drugs?”

Many of the people with autism I’ve met take a lot of things very literally. Think of what could have happened if the kid had replied with “I’ve got my clothes on me” and the asshole cop thought he was being a smartass.

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Sorry, that’s too much to ask from an officer who has received special training to be a “drug recognition expert.” You just can’t make this shit up. From the NYT article:

As a graduate of Arizona’s Drug Evaluation and Classification program, Officer Grossman is certified as a “drug recognition expert.”

Also, this murder was committed last night:

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https://twitter.com/shaunking/status/910695681626603522

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The cop’s reaction was fine. Yes, he went for a takedown faster than I cared for but, as the parent of a 19-yr old autistic boy with behaviors extremely similar to Connor’s, I know that I have a biased opinion and, after pausing to think about, I think the officer did a respectable job. He saw a person who appeared to be on drugs and acted accordingly. He was not “trigger happy,” he did not get angry, violent or otherwise aggressive. He actually took seriously the word of, what was to him, a passing stranger and adjusted his behavior accordingly. It was even noted that the police there do watch for medic alert ID, but Connor did not have one. Yes, it would be wonderful if more police departments could provide more training for situations like this, but so would a million other things. Realistically, training for every potential situation would take a lifetime.

At least he wasn’t killed.

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