Scuba diver has been visiting the same fish nearly every day for 30 years


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/07/26/scuba-diver-has-been-visiting.html


#2

Wow, that was cool.


#3

The feels are real.


#4

Charming Russian 1989 animation re a man and his fish-friend. (PS: Music by Paul Winter; mucho thanks to anyone who can tell me which album it comes from!)


#5

So he did what any friend would do: he took care of Yoriko, feeding her crabs and nursing her back to health.

I don’t mean to rain on this. It’s really quite touching. But it also involves a lot of crabs eaten alive.


#6

Good thing crabs are evil ]:<


#7

You’ve heard of nature?


#8

I dig on the fact that the dude dives every day! Man, that’s the life.


#9

He seems to do it to maintain an underwater shrine, though obviously diving is his passion. His friendship with the fish seems a natural extension of the Shinto practice of worshiping nature. It’s very heartwarming to see this story though, i wonder how long those fish live.


#10

Wonder what his occupation is. Wonderfully nice story.


#11

Dude, I have to admire your dedication but if that fish hasn’t granted you those three wishes by now then he probably never will.


#12

wow, so touching. i’ll add this story to my ever-growing pile of evidence that animals are smarter and understand a lot more than we give them credit for.


#13

Honest question: How the hell has this gentle fish not been eaten by sharks in over 30 years?


#14

There’s also this (that I may have seen here originally)


#15

Maybe its one of those things like the condemned prisoner who tells the king if he grants him a year to live he can teach the king’s horse to sing. The king laughs and agrees to the request. And every day, the prison is there working in the stables, grooming the horse, and teaching it to sing. After several months the guards take a shine to the prisoner and one asks, after a while, why he is doing this.

“I get to sleep in the stables and I eat better than the other prisoners, you guards don’t beat me every day any more. And here’s the thing, the king could forget. The king could die. And maybe… just maybe… the horse will sing.”


#16

in all those years (30 years, visiting everyday), you are telling me he never tried to bone it? I fine that hard to believe.


#17

Pudge controls the weather


#18

So, sharks are more selective than you would think.

Being like anything else, they go for the biggest caloric payout for the least danger. (Danger? Sure, they tend not to bite stuff that is likely to poke it in the eye) So, when they hunt, they go for injured animals, or animals which are massively nourishing (like seals). Likely, that particular animal may not be oily enough for the trouble–meaning either it’d have to be gravely wounded, or a shark gravely hungry.


#19

These things must taste terrible or are the fish equivalent of eating snow cones.


#20

Which supports the point I often make, that sharks don’t attack people. They nibble. They are curious. Though very effective predators, they don’t belong to the most intelligent species in the oceans. Also some shark individuals may be just too dumb to remember that humans are not actually tasty. We are skinny, bony creatures. Most of us anyway.
But my main point is: if a shark attacks you in the water, you don’t get to swim to shore and tell the tale. You weren’t attacked, dude. You were nibbbled at.