The linguistics of Black Metal, and how to translate common English phrases into the Dark Lord's Tongue


#1

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#2

While I realize that many Black/Death metal logos are hard to read, I would think that Nile's logo is one of the easier ones to decipher.

Vile is a different band altogether...


#3

Err, the band in the linked video is called Nile, not Vile... Funny stuff anyway. (:


#4

Melodrama is perpetually popular because being alive is too often taken for granted. But when you take life really, really seriously, it somehow becomes absurd. An enlightening paradox.


#5

Norwegian black metal? Come on, the article clearly states it's talking about death metal, which is a different genre, and says that "[Death Metal English] is most common in Anglophone countries [...]", listing a bunch of American and British examples with a few extra from Switzerland, Sweden and Finland, but no reference to Norway at all.


#6

Black Metal and Death Metal are two distinct genres of metal. Crossover between the two is called Blackened Death Metal.

GET WITH IT PEOPLE!


#7

My favorite piece of stage banter came from the singer of Nile. He said, in full metal voice, "This isn't Philadelphia! This is Metaldelphia!" So lame and so awesome at the same time. Still gets quotes from time to time 10 years later.


#8

Oh, derp. Corrected, thanks for the pedantry! THANKS WERE RENDERED UNTO THE VOICELESS SKULLS OF ETHER WHO SPOKE THE UN-UTTERED WORDS ON THE SCREECHING WINDS, rather.


#9

Death metal/black metal is just good old fun. The pageantry, the posturing, the lyrics, the sheer self-parodying over-the-topness of it all. It's like a rockin' circus.

I was recently informed that there's dudes in Scandinavia who take it seriously. I think that might be even funnier.


#10

The first thing this reminded me of is when Valor took over Christian Death and started writing lyrics like "your church makes me vomit / into the vertiginous abyss". We always used to laugh at the unrelenting seriousness of that lyric.

Still, I'd much rather hear death metal lyrics than some lame pop singer talking about her vagina.


#11

Death Metal mis-hearings are always good too. To my friends and I, Nile will always be remembered for the immortal poetry of "In the parlance of a cupcake: I am a cup of tea!!!"


#12

I just realized what "Invisible Oranges" are, and there is one right in the BB post.

I love people that do something inherently silly and go "You know what, we're not playing this down, we're going to turn it up to 11!"

That said, I'm not sure how many metal fans can even make out the lyrics on a typical song, especially ones using $5 words and bizarre sentence construction. Most of the ones I've heard (admittedly this is an outsiders perspective) have been growlscreamed at maximum volume and with complete and total distortion.


#13

I had to look it up:
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=invisible%20orange

Translation:
CONSULTATION OF THE OMNISCIENT ORACLE GOOGLE
DIRECTED TO REPOSITORY OF COMMON MAN'S WISDOM
TERMINOLOGICAL DEMYSTIFICATION, IGNORANCE IS SHED LIKE WATER


#14

Well, some of it. In other cases as when they are going on about "The white wolves from the north..." not so much imho.


#15

Oh Wikipedia, won't you please save me from my cultural ignorance?

From Black Metal

During the 1980s, several thrash metal and death metal bands formed a prototype for black metal.1 This so-called "first wave" included bands such as Venom, Bathory, Hellhammer and Celtic Frost.[4] A "second wave" arose in the early 1990s, spearheaded by Norwegian bands such as Mayhem, Burzum, Darkthrone, Immortal and Emperor. The early Norwegian black metal scene developed the style of their forebears into a distinct genre. Norwegian-inspired black metal scenes emerged throughout Europe and North America, although some other scenes developed their own styles with no connection to the Norwegian one.[5]

From Death Metal

Building from the musical structure of thrash metal and early black metal, death metal emerged during the mid-1980s.2 Metal bands such as Slayer,[4][5] Kreator,[6] Celtic Frost,[7] and Venom were very important influences to the crafting of the genre.2 Possessed[8] and Death,[9][10][11] along with bands such as Obituary, Carcass, Deicide, Cannibal Corpse and Morbid Angel are often considered pioneers of the genre.[12] In the late 1980s and early 1990s, death metal gained more media attention as popular genre niche record labels like Combat, Earache and Roadrunner began to sign death metal bands at a rapid rate.[13] Since then, death metal has diversified, spawning a variety of subgenres.[14]

That's the problem with metal bands these days. No one wants to be the chicken. No one wants to be the egg.


#16

BTW, the "Chapter Of Obeisance Before Giving Breath To The Inert One In The Presence Of The Cresent-Shaped Horns" video sounds like it's a victim of the loudness wars. There's no dynamic range-- which may be why they sound absolutely terrible.


#17

The list of Scandinavian black metal luminaries who died via their own hands or through foul play isn't short. Then there's the arson, random murder, abduction of mental patients to perform vocals on albums, assault, kidnapping, torture, and general mayhem.

Fun times.


#18

"Praying my Mazda Bongo will start"


#19

The best is when non-english speaking metaldudes write in Metal English. Rampant, unrepentant sequipedalianism + (poorly understood English syntax/grammar / awesome foreign syntactical/grammatical rules) x blast beats = perfection.


#20

showing age, hardcore punk had similar, growly stylings. http://grooveshark.com/#!/search/song?q=S.N.O.T.+Harass+county

all about the music.

screechingless, windless, windless screeching winds???