This small digital scale I like is on sale for $7.64


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/08/14/this-small-digital-scale-i-lik.html


#2

Does it work for c-c-c-c-c-cocaine?

Asking for a friend.


#3

“supplement powders”


#4

I have that scale and love it! The scale came with my baker’s kit for culinary school. You can only measure very small amounts with it, but for baking anything with a very specific ingredient requirement, it’s perfect.


#5

I’m no expert on scales or coins but wouldn’t this indicate an error variance with the scale?


#6

given that a cup of flour has a mass of about 120g (depending on all sorts of factors), this would not be useful for baking.


#7

He really likes that scale.


#8

Not true! I’ve used it in very many of my baking classes. It depends on what you have to make. Commercial kitchens, in order to be consistent, use gram measurements for everything from salt to baking powder. Cook’s Science, part of the Cook’s Illustrated / America’s Test Kitchen group recently started listing gram measurements for ALL recipies. I strongly recommend, especially for baking, that folks consider a scale, rather than volume measurements, for recipies - and having both a larger scale for measuring large items (that rarely have .1gm accuracy) and a smaller scale like this one is a definite plus.


#9

Inexpensive, portable digital scale: $7.64
Background check by the DEA: priceless


#10

I have perhaps failed to realize just how fixated my neighbours to the south are on drugs at this point. :wink:


#11

If one weighed coins in (literal) mint condition, they might reasonably be expected to have very consistent mass, for a given denomination.

But as soon as a coin goes into circulation, it becomes subject to abrasion that causes it to lose mass, and each coin’s experience will be unique.


#12

@frauenfelder
The link goes to a product that weighs up to 600g - the SWS600. The picture has AWS-100. Which is/was it? Did you link to the wrong product?


#13

It used to be a problem when we had gold and silver coins.

In the process of sweating, coins were placed in a bag and shaken. The bits of metal that had worn off the coins were recovered from the bottom of the bag. Sweating tended to wear the coin in a more natural way than clipping, and so was harder to detect.


#14

Mark, you got the wrong scale. A milligram capable scale is made and sold by the same company.
I recently purchased one to accurately weigh gold and silver that I use in jewelry design.


#15

I knew about coin clipping, but I only learned about “sweating” from your post.

Thank you :exclamation:

Proposed edit above :slightly_smiling_face:


#16

The whole “being burned at the stake or being hanged, drawn and quartered” thing if you were caught was an effective deterrent though.


#17

Especially after they’ve been inserted into the rectum, in a process known as “coining”…


#18

I have the same scale, use it for coffee since I do my espresso shots by weight. Like it a lot.


#19

You use scale that goes up to 5kg for sugar, flour, fat, milk and other main ingredients. But such a scale would not be usable for dosing salt, yeast, and other things needed in small amounts.

I have bought similar scale in a shop that sells very cheap Chinese imported goods. Great for mixing small amounts of epoxy and other resins. Much more consistent results.


#20

D-D-D-D-Dohktah Rockso Suh-Suh-Suh-Swears it’s just headache powdah, Baaaybee!