TOM THE DANCING BUG: Did You Know Fun Facts About Boston?


#1

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#2

As a former resident of Masasasssaasassacchoooioossettststtss, and longtime admirer of both the Hub Of The Center Of All Things and the region’s numerous and varied sporting franchises (Worcester Sharks, holla!)… I have no problem with this cartoon.

Still enjoying a few more days of World Champion Boston Red Sox good feelings here.


#3

That was pretty weak.

I’m just gonna leave this here:


#4

I’ll just live this here.


#5

I grew up on candlepin, but Boston Bowl has always had ten-pin (what I assume most people just call “bowling”), and lot of other places have opened around here in the last decade that also have regular bowling.


#6

Two slights against Canada in single comic strip! Good thing they are both funny, Bolling.


#7

I’ll admit that “Hub of the Universe” is pretty ridiculous, but blame Oliver Wendell Holmes who came up with the phrase back in the 1858 (back when every American city was a one-horse-town compared to anything in Europe.)

My own favorite nickname is “Boston, at least it’s not Cleveland.”


#8

Oh come on, you guys like any attention.


#9

Be nice. We’re very helpful, you know: we do our best to keep their hockey team’s pretensions in check. Le Bleu-Blanc-Rouge, even past their glory days, still does that on a fairly regular basis (see last year’s playoffs).


#10

#11

ehhh. . . compared to NYC or LA most American cites are Scranton.

It’s not like guys from Jersey have anything to be proud of (except their proximity to NYC.)


#12

I lived in Scranton for 15 years, and after episode I would point out that the math showed that Scranton == (Boston - clams).

I shared the cartoon with my just-off-rt-9-metro-west-originating wife this morning, and she thought it was mean-spirited.


#13

I live in Boston, I didn’t find it mean-spirited, I got a kick out of it. Some of it is accurate (there are Dunkin Donuts on every damn corner) but some of it is obvious exaggeration for effect (there are a surprising number of celebrities from Boston, and they’re not all named “Wahlberg”)-- the Scranton comparison is funny because of how inaccurate it is.


#14

As a proud native Masshole, I endorse this cartoon. Tom takes some cheap, overused, banal shots…and misses some much more insulting, genuinely cutting, authentic snark…but I’m OK with it.

Like Mr. Steampunk Bananna wrote…we just love being the center of attention up heah…


#15

Well, I’m from waayyyy down on the South Shore…and we don’t have the same regional chip on the shoulder that seems to be the norm out there in Metrowest.

As for being mean-spirited to us…that’s kind of ironic; meaness is in our DNA around here. We wrote the book on the subject, according to nearly everyone else in the US.

As I tell my own spouse who hails from far, far away: I yam what I yam.


#16

To be fair, in the 19th century in America, even if it couldn’t compare to the great cities of Europe, Boston was the place to be, much as Philadelphia was in the previous century. New York didn’t really come into its own as the “in” city of America until the 20th century.


#17

I was hoping for funnier.


#18

Don’t forget the massive inferiority complex with respect to NYC, and the way MIT students steal the sun for half of every year until everyone can ransom it back!


#19

Unfortunately, the early censuses weren’t detailed enough to break down the population into the “cool” and “uncool”


#20

I am very proud of my proximity to NYC. Most parts of Oregon are at least 2500 miles away.